sephira: (Bones: Booth and Brennan)
"Her brow, her nose, her chin, presented that equilibrium of outline which is quite distinct from equilibrium of proportion, and from which harmony of countenance results; in the very characteristic interval which separates the base of the nose from the upper lip, she had that imperceptible and charming fold, a mysterious sign of chastity, which makes Barberousse fall in love with a Diana found in the treasures of Iconia."

Am I reading this right that he's talking about her philtrum? Do French people not have these? Was FAS so prevalent in 19th-century France that having a philtrum was a symbol of classiness? Did Victor "Word Count" Hugo just need to buy a new hat that day and was just writing whatever random associations came to mind while describing completely normal parts of the human face?

I am curious! Google is not helping but I might be doing it wrong!
sephira: (GIRLS)
There is an antique store in Seattle that sells vintage magazines for around $5-11, depending not so much on how old or rare they are as how much porn is inside. Don't ask me, I'm not a Seattle antique person. Anyway, I decided this was the best thing ever, but luckily I didn't have too much cash on me, so I only bought a couple:




ROMANCE. And CUBA )
sephira: (GIRLS)
There is an antique store in Seattle that sells vintage magazines for around $5-11, depending not so much on how old or rare they are as how much porn is inside. Don't ask me, I'm not a Seattle antique person. Anyway, I decided this was the best thing ever, but luckily I didn't have too much cash on me, so I only bought a couple:




ROMANCE. And CUBA )
sephira: (Default)
  • An alternate history story based in a society that uses the Enuma Elish as a creation myth rather than Genesis. I wouldn't want the story to be particularly focused on that fact. Just like, a murder mystery or something.

  • A modified version of the Twilight series, where the vampire dude feeds solely on adorable little kittens. Everything else in the books is the same.


I would also settle for a movie version of the above.

sephira: (Default)
  • An alternate history story based in a society that uses the Enuma Elish as a creation myth rather than Genesis. I wouldn't want the story to be particularly focused on that fact. Just like, a murder mystery or something.

  • A modified version of the Twilight series, where the vampire dude feeds solely on adorable little kittens. Everything else in the books is the same.


I would also settle for a movie version of the above.

sephira: (Default)
Seriously, where has this guy been all my life?

I'm kind of embarrassed about it because some of the psychological stuff he's written could technically be called self-help, but the psychology's so fascinating, and so different to what you'd expect to find in that genre, that I can't help it. And he does his own audio books, so it's a bit like being lectured at by a cranky elderly relative who is a bit crazy and atheist and stuff, but is nevertheless possessed of MUCH WISDOM.

Okay, so I don't talk him up very well, but seriously, he's pretty good. )


I also like how he manages to work in a 'by the way, I slept with Ayn Rand' story into every second chapter. We know you did, sir. We know you did.
sephira: (Default)
Seriously, where has this guy been all my life?

I'm kind of embarrassed about it because some of the psychological stuff he's written could technically be called self-help, but the psychology's so fascinating, and so different to what you'd expect to find in that genre, that I can't help it. And he does his own audio books, so it's a bit like being lectured at by a cranky elderly relative who is a bit crazy and atheist and stuff, but is nevertheless possessed of MUCH WISDOM.

Okay, so I don't talk him up very well, but seriously, he's pretty good. )


I also like how he manages to work in a 'by the way, I slept with Ayn Rand' story into every second chapter. We know you did, sir. We know you did.
sephira: (Default)
So, I've been looking for a good English version of the Arabian Nights/One Thousand and One Nights/Kitab alf leila wa leila/whatever for a while now. I was just seconds away from buying Husain Haddawy's 'complete English translation' of Arabian Nights on Amazon when I saw that the site was offering me another book with it called 'Volume Two.'

Why would a complete set need a supplementary volume? Turns out Mr Hassady thought that a whole chunk of what's accepted these days as the Arabian Nights just wasn't historically reliable. So he only translated what he thought was the real, 'pure' Arabian Nights, which turns out to be less than one third of what you're promised in the title (only 271 nights.)

Holy crap, it's like Martin Luther all over again.

SRSLY, I don't care if you can't find a surviving manuscript before the fourteenth century or whatever, buddy. Just translate the goddam story.

All I have at the moment are the versions of Burton and Madrus/Mathers. The Burton version is clunky crap. There is something to be said about the style of Madrus/Mathers:

"While I waited for food to be served, I profited by our nearness to show the tenderness of my heart and to prove that her coming was a blessing to me; I caressed her gently, trying to tame her strange soul; I carried her hand to my lips and to my heart, as carefully as if I was touching some very old and costly fabric which might dissolve in dust under my fingers. I passed my hand over the silk of her hair and, as Allah lives, I shall never forget that contact; instead of the warmth of living hair it was as if these yellow tresses had been spun from some frozen metal, or as if my fingers dabbled in a silk floss dipped among melting snow. For a moment I had a terrible thought that she might have been made entirely from a cold and exquisite metal; but then I considered in my soul the infinite power of Allah Who gives our girls hair as black and warm as the wing of night, and crowns the maidens of the North with frozen flame. Feeling my bride so different from the women of my own blood, I thrilled with fear and delight at once, and, as I gazed stupidly upon her, found myself attributing unknown and unnatural powers to her chill beauty."

But it's not reliably accurate (doubly translated), and also rather weird in parts. Like, for example, many of the, ahem, 'love scenes' suddenly start, uh, rhyming. Here's an example. It's like one of the translators got bored, or possibly embarrassed. Is it mimicking a certain style in the original? I don't know. I'm way too embarrassed to type '1001 nights original porn scenes' into Google.

So believe it or not, there isn't any complete English translation of the Thousand and One Nights. Not one that doesn't suck, anyway. Almost makes me want to brush up on my ancient Arabic and do it myself.


sephira: (Default)
So, I've been looking for a good English version of the Arabian Nights/One Thousand and One Nights/Kitab alf leila wa leila/whatever for a while now. I was just seconds away from buying Husain Haddawy's 'complete English translation' of Arabian Nights on Amazon when I saw that the site was offering me another book with it called 'Volume Two.'

Why would a complete set need a supplementary volume? Turns out Mr Hassady thought that a whole chunk of what's accepted these days as the Arabian Nights just wasn't historically reliable. So he only translated what he thought was the real, 'pure' Arabian Nights, which turns out to be less than one third of what you're promised in the title (only 271 nights.)

Holy crap, it's like Martin Luther all over again.

SRSLY, I don't care if you can't find a surviving manuscript before the fourteenth century or whatever, buddy. Just translate the goddam story.

All I have at the moment are the versions of Burton and Madrus/Mathers. The Burton version is clunky crap. There is something to be said about the style of Madrus/Mathers:

"While I waited for food to be served, I profited by our nearness to show the tenderness of my heart and to prove that her coming was a blessing to me; I caressed her gently, trying to tame her strange soul; I carried her hand to my lips and to my heart, as carefully as if I was touching some very old and costly fabric which might dissolve in dust under my fingers. I passed my hand over the silk of her hair and, as Allah lives, I shall never forget that contact; instead of the warmth of living hair it was as if these yellow tresses had been spun from some frozen metal, or as if my fingers dabbled in a silk floss dipped among melting snow. For a moment I had a terrible thought that she might have been made entirely from a cold and exquisite metal; but then I considered in my soul the infinite power of Allah Who gives our girls hair as black and warm as the wing of night, and crowns the maidens of the North with frozen flame. Feeling my bride so different from the women of my own blood, I thrilled with fear and delight at once, and, as I gazed stupidly upon her, found myself attributing unknown and unnatural powers to her chill beauty."

But it's not reliably accurate (doubly translated), and also rather weird in parts. Like, for example, many of the, ahem, 'love scenes' suddenly start, uh, rhyming. Here's an example. It's like one of the translators got bored, or possibly embarrassed. Is it mimicking a certain style in the original? I don't know. I'm way too embarrassed to type '1001 nights original porn scenes' into Google.

So believe it or not, there isn't any complete English translation of the Thousand and One Nights. Not one that doesn't suck, anyway. Almost makes me want to brush up on my ancient Arabic and do it myself.


sephira: (Default)
Is there a name for this style of writing?

'The Case Against Satan' by Ray Russell, published 1962: )


'Psychopaths' by Alan Harrington, published 1972: )


From 'Psychopaths' again, the same style in non-fiction: )


I've tried to think of a name to classify the style exactly, although so far all I can come up with is 'Beatnik short-sentence alarm prose' and 'Bladerunner Narration Uber-Noir.' Can you think of anything else?

And is it still around today, and I just don't know about it, since I only really find the old stuff in secondhand book stores?

I would highly recommend the second book, by the way. Especially considering the fact that the author wrote another book called The Secret Swinger.

sephira: (Default)
Is there a name for this style of writing?

'The Case Against Satan' by Ray Russell, published 1962: )


'Psychopaths' by Alan Harrington, published 1972: )


From 'Psychopaths' again, the same style in non-fiction: )


I've tried to think of a name to classify the style exactly, although so far all I can come up with is 'Beatnik short-sentence alarm prose' and 'Bladerunner Narration Uber-Noir.' Can you think of anything else?

And is it still around today, and I just don't know about it, since I only really find the old stuff in secondhand book stores?

I would highly recommend the second book, by the way. Especially considering the fact that the author wrote another book called The Secret Swinger.

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